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Knowledge, what?

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Categories: Others, Theories of Knowlegde (TOK)

What is a knowledge claim?

“A knowledge claim is something that the claimant believes to be true, yet is also open to discussion and debate. It is therefore important that a knowledge claim is something that we believe we know and that we want to assess the validity of”

– Quoted from Scott Langston’s edublog

How do we obtain knowledge?

  • Shared knowledge
    A knowledge that is passed, shared, explained; from an individual to another individual.
    E.g. Your mom thaught you about how to wash dishes.
  • Personal knowledge
    A knowledge that you obtained by experiencing/witnessing something.
    E.e You went to the amusement park together with your friends for the first time. You had so much fun and concluded that amusement parks are fun.

Fixed (maybe) knowledge and flexible knowledge

Biology
In biology, we call out throat the “oesophagus”. Oesophagus moves (swallows) the food we injest from our mouth by the movement of muscles called “peristalsis”. How do we know that out throat does this? Because scientist from the past had conducted experiments and observations on us, humans, when we swallow food. Then, scientists concluded a knowledge claim that our throat helps us swallow food with muscles. This is a fixed knowledge because swallowing happens to all of us humans, and we are thaught about this in class by shared knowledge from our teachers.

Art
In arts, things are more flexible. My knowledge in painting and your knowledge in painting is completely different. Maybe he could paint realisticly whilst he could only do illustrations of cartoons. So which one is true? Which one is the “real” art? There is no right answer in art because more personal knowledge is incolced in this particular area. Everyone can create their own art and anyone can judge or appreciate which masterpieces are considered art.

     
Art by Steve Caldwell                                            Character Concept by Paul Kwon

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